• Canonical Ltd.: Seeking a home-based project management pro

    Canonical Careers

    Canonical Ltd.: Seeking a home-based project management pro. Work with a top-notch global team of engineers, clients and technology partners on the cutting-edge of the cloud space. See also: other Ubuntu Cloud, Openstack architect, Linux engineer, open source developer, continuous integration, devops and QA jobs at http://www.canonical.com/careers/.

    https://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH03/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=CANONICAL&cws=1&rid=813

  • Joining Canonical: Ubuntu Server & OpenStack Team

    ubuntu-for-rbwordpressFor over 15 years, I’ve been leveraging the power of Linux and Open Source Software in business network deployments.   Through my former consulting company, and eventually the company which acquired that business, there have been many cherished experiences, and countless invaluable relationships forged.  The time has come to change direction from the managed services, business consulting and system deployment worlds, over to the planet where such Linux things are born.

    For the past 4 years, I’ve worked with the business and technology minds at SCTelcom to combine and transform my former business into the area’s premier IT solutions provider. Together, we have fine-tuned a serious team of talent to support this area’s businesses and our own ISP/Telcom operations. I am very confident in SCTelcom’s continued commitment to provide solid solutions, responsive support and top-notch talent. The company is strong and it is dedicated to the people and businesses of this area.

    canonical-250-for-rbwordpressNext week, I join Canonical on the Ubuntu Server and OpenStack team.  The team I’m about to join is a global group of developers, unified on the mission of producing the best open source platform in existence.  Working for Canonical will be a new culture and an exciting experience with a lot of new ground for me to cover.  Conversations with Canonical staff over the past couple of months have given me a glimpse into a work force who are each extraordinarily passionate about their work in open source.  I will no doubt miss my former coworkers, employees and long-time clients, though I know that they will be in very good hands with SCTelcom’s talented crew and bright future.

    Jenkins, JuJu, Launchpad, Ubuntu LTS, UDS, OpenStack Summit and work item burndowns – here I come!

    A big huge THANK YOU to the area businesses and individuals who have been a part of my business & career over the past 15 years. I am so grateful for the support, patronage and friendship! #blessed

     

  • Moving from CentOS to Ubuntu

    It’s no secret that I have historically been a RHEL and CentOS guy.  Red Hat Advanced Server before that.  I think the recent bond made official between Red Hat and CentOS is exciting for those groups and the affected communities.  Over the past several years, I’ve seen and heard from peers and others the industry … a massive excitement over Ubuntu.  But I already had my stable platforms humming along, so I didn’t pay much attention to Canonical or Ubuntu.  Or at least not until OpenStack.

    For anyone wanting to deploy OpenStack, Ubuntu is the reference platform to do so.  RHEL and CentOS can do it, but it is currently just not a natural fit.  Canonical has one heck of a head start with JuJu, MaaS and Landscape.  Granted – one can indeed use packstack or RDO on RHEL-based distros.  That is still a long shot from where Ubuntu already is today.

    When I decided to seriously consider a career shift in working for Canonical on the Ubuntu Server and Openstack Team, I rebuilt my business and home stacks with Ubuntu LTS.  Prior *nix experience made for a quick pick-up of the Ubuntu/Debian similarities and differences.  In the interest of not inviting yet another Linux distribution debate, I’ll just say that I quite like Ubuntu LTS.  Ubuntu server is now my platform of choice.

    What about Unity?  Mir?  Upstart?  I’m traditionally an X control freak, and enjoy XFCE’s ability to be tweeked and tugged how I see fit.  When I rebuilt my desktop powerhouse, I stuck with XFCE on Ubuntu LTS.  But on my new work laptop, Unity it is!  It just works, no manipulations necessary.  Linux for human beings, check.

    The asynchronous Upstart is probably my biggest acceptance challenge at the moment, but I attribute that to not possessing granular knowledge of it yet.  I understand the contrast and benefits, but that hasn’t stopped me from occasionally tripping over my init tendencies.

    Canonical’s goal of a unified code base for server, desktop, mobile and others is quite a massive and worthy undertaking.  While it may seem to many that they are reinventing the wheel with Mir, and that they have already reinvented the wheel with Upstart, these bold moves are what set Ubuntu aside from all other distros.  The community and the company are investing in some fairly major changes.  Change always brings stress and resistance.  Pushing through the uncomfortable and awkward beginnings is how change is made successful.

    Push on, push on!

    ——————– ——————– ——————–

    Addendum – a useful Ubunto Wiki doc for those making the same journey.  After completing a recent shift from RHEL/CentOS to Ubuntu, I found this nice reference:

    SwitchingToUbuntu – Switching from Red Hat to Ubuntu;  Switching from CentOS to Ubuntu;  an equivalent command translation reference.

    • chkconfig vs. updaterc.d
    • service start vs. invoke-rc.d
    • yum search vs. apt-cache search
    • yum install vs. apt-get install
    • rpm vs. dpkg

     

  • Welcome

    Welcome!  Here you will find posts about things that I find interesting:  OpenStack, Open Source, Ubuntu Server, Linux, Cloud Computing, and other miscellaneous, sometimes random thoughts. 

    As with any of my content, this is not official documentation, and it may not apply to your your specific environment.  The opinions expressed here are my own, not the formal stance of any other party.  Take care, always test in a non-production environment, and remember to Read The Full Manual.

     I hope you enjoy.  Feel free to find me or contact me for discussion.

    Best to you!

  • Red Hat testing the OpenStack waters

    I’ve been following OpenStack’s maturity pretty closely over the past year.  Since the late 1990’s, I’ve taken note that as goes Red Hat, so goes the herd when it comes to enterprise Linux solutions.  Of course, in many cases, that may very well be “I like what you’ve got going, watch me do it better.”  That is also is not to minimize the impressive impact of Canonical, HP, IBM, Mirantis and Rackspace.  This is merely an observation that when Red Hat throws their support and weight at a project, things tend to change.

    As a relative late-comer to the OpenStack Foundation (platinum member since 2012), Red Hat is contributing $500K per year and a sizable chunk in terms of software engineering labor.  One must assume that it intends to monetize these efforts with a Red Hat OpenStack offering some day soon.  If so, what does that mean for RHEL pet projects oVirt and Aeolus?  And RHEV?  Who knows.  Their continued sponsorship of those projects raises my eyebrow a bit, that they might just be slightly over-hedged and confused.

    Meanwhile, Canonical seems to be quietly dominating this developing space with Ubuntu Server.  It will be interesting to watch as Canonical and Red Hat cloud platform offerings mature.  I’ll be looking for the OpenStack.  May the most clever hat or non-hat win.